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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
allocation. how do you generate returns and manage volatility in this kind of environment where there's so much you can't control? global head of institutional clients with jpmorgan asset management, welcome. i'm going to ask something that may be counter intuitive to a lot of people. maybe not to you. it seems to me your clients, institutions, pensions, endowments, are tax exempt. they don't have to worry quite as much it would seem to me about avoiding dividend taxes or capital gains taxes as ordinary individuals. am i right about that or wrong? >> yes and no. the point being if the fiscal cliff you look at china, eurozone, it is all coming together to create an environment of total uncertainty for a lot of the biggest investors in the world. pension funds in the u.s. are trying to manage the volatility of the funding levels, generating return. think of where the average u.s. pension fund is trying to again rate a return from 6.5% to 8%. >> it's not so much that they're concerned about a looming tax hike that might affect their portfolios as it is about the uncertainty that the cliff rep
environment, once google has seen that new rocketship, i see no reason why google should be any different. especially since google owns android. they need to figure out how to monetize it better. something the company is doing by releasing its own line of smartphones and tablets. google is sold out until after christmas. of the growth stocks, i got to admit i like google less than i did before the bad quarter if you're trying to figure out which of these stocks worries me the most, it's google, it's become a show-me situation. how about visa and master cad? both up decently since i recommended them in october. these are both plays in the worldwide switch from paper currency to plastic. visa and mastercard both reported strong quarters in october, they have healthy balance sheets. mastercard is winning new business all over the place. and visa announced a $1 billion buyback. even though visa has a new ceo, i'm a big fan of both stocks. i think they're both candidates to offer special dividends as the year unwinds. they've got the cash for certain. then there's the sherwin williams. the sto
of hearing about frankly. the overburdensome regulatory environment that we're in is depressing growth, particularly for small business. and i think that's a primary distinction here as we talk about business itself because all business is not created equal. and the president's jobs council who has some wonderful folks, some friends of mind on it, wholly inefficient in my view because there is no representation from small business on that jobs council. melissa: catherine, let me ask you, what i look what happened with the case in darden, it seems like what happened to a bunch of different companies, my take at the end of the day, for sure they're not going to hire anyone and that's what we need more than anything right now. >> you're exactly right. what we need are jobs, jobs, jobs. there is so much uncertainty out there right now with what will happen with taxes. we still don't know the full impacts of obamacare. hundreds of thousands of new regulations. we need to know what is going on to make good decisions and grow our businesses because of that. melissa: jamie, do you think to a c
people are. we're in a greatly diminished yield environment. people scramble for what they can. if you think yields are low know, a lot of investors think they could even go lower. it's unbelievable how low the yields are in the fixed income markets, but again, i think you're going to see compression with those types of stocks. i think what you're really going to see is dividend policies revisited contrary to the fact that from a tax point of view, folks are going to be basically less likely to buy dividend stocks because investors want income, and that's the only place they can get it. >> michael, we get a handf fufu companies every day declaring dividends. they're accelerating the payment to try to beat out the fiscal cliff. would you invest looking for companies like that right now? >> i think you're seeing the top of the dividend trade. i think if anything, what's going to end up happening is a focus back into cyclical sectors for 2013. you want the global trade. you don't want the domestic trade anymore. >> you're not going to be jumping on the bandwagon here just because companie
investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> an environment where everyone is still terrified about the potential impact of the fiscal cliff, i want to give you stocks that you can fall back on in a declining market. many strong companies, high yields. let me introduce you to weingarten, a company i've liked since '85. owns shopping centers all over the u.s. 301 income-producing properties and 11 more in various stages of development. they have a yield, doesn't have a lot of leverage. company recently sold off the portfolio of industrial assets to become a pure play on retail, and 70% of the rent it collects comes from tenants that are effectively internet resistant. they say it in their own papers. meaning they're immunized against online competition. things like supermarkets, restaurants, personal care supervisors. 93.6% occupancy rate up 200 basis points year-over-year. very bullish guidance. let's check in with drew alexander, the president and ceo of weingarten reality investors. how are you? >> pleasure. great to be here. >> now, we obviously are all very focused on the
because we're stuck in a real tough environment right now with that darn fiscal cliff deadline looming, three weeks away, our political leaders getting absolutely nowhere -- >> buy buy buy! >> sell sell sell! >> it doesn't mean we stop searching for opportunities to make money. even in the most dismal markets there are always stocks that have the ability to go higher. just got to find them. takes a lot of work. one i've been doing a lot of work on, it's called dst systems. dog sam tom. now, dst is not a great business. hmm. but i think it could be a terrific stock. the reason? i see number signs suggesting that dst could be preparing itself for a sale. and if not, it sure as heck should be. but even if dst doesn't get bought out, it has a fabulous story. it's a tale that we've repeated over and over again. it's one that's made big money in a number of stocks for us. see, dst, which is just a terrible name for a company, but that's what they call themselves, is a company where the whole is currently worth a lot less than the parts. now, in recent months dst has started to get aggressive
remember to put money to work. in an environment where not people put money to work and people aren't doing anything, you get an influx of retail money. you have to commit that money to your retirement and to your kids. >> interesting. >> it's a big difference. >> btig has a note on seasonality regarding the end of the year and even december '08 was positive. how resilient the month of december is. >> funny you mention that. that was such a false tell. we thought maybe things had bottomed and then just off a cliff, not fiscal but stock right after that. it's a great note. >> meantime, as we await the opening bell this morning, we'll look at the s&p 500 at the realtime exchange on the top of your screen. big board here. >> there's the bell over at the nasdaq today, sears holdings and st. jude's children's research hospital celebrating the st. jude thanks and giving campaign. lead story involves delta and talks they say to acquire from singapore some stakes in virgin atlanta. >> we'll see what happens. they have been active. the one people are more focused on is american airlines in bankruptc
. they are building and acquiring land in this low interest rate environment which bodes well for this upswing in momentum. the question as you mentioned at what point do comparisons get so tough. first quarter 2012 was first quarter where they started to see the upswing. 45% increase in signed contracts. we're lapping that now. can we beat increases as we move on? >> it could be tough. to the extent that we're building, any momentum at the bottom here, we're still building off a small base as you know. so you could have significant growth for some time. >> everything that goes into a house. a lot of spending goes into a house. >> definitely. cramer has stocks on his list that are worthy of your attention. what does he think about them? his mad dash is coming up next. later, shares of gamestop surging from summer lows hoping to score big this holiday season. we'll talk with the ceo. let's take another look at futures as we head into this tuesday morning session. we're looking about flat. more "squawk on the street" straight ahead. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between u
're in a situation where the economy is not growing there are no jobs. we're facing an inflationary environment too. it is troubling, and it is just about politics, and ideology and pushing that forward no matter what without thinking -- >> what they are saying is that obama will have to give more, than entitlement cuts and spending cuts and republicans might have to acquiesce to tax hikes. lou: what is the republican party coming, monica used expression political party suicide, i don't know if that drastic but there is a defeatism i find astonishing. >> they hope to stan strong together in one message, we need a warrior that is why i'm delighted that jim demint is leaving and going to the heritage foundation, we don't have a clear champion on our issue, senator rubio does a great job but we need more out there jan the kuh cuban guy from florida. lou: i tell you, right now, i may be insulting a lot of people, but he is the most ex fisk communicate or -- effective communicate or the republican party has but he is not talking about the fiscal cliff. >> he said we have to did is not create new taxes b
is the honorable sherman, under secretary for natural resources and environment at the u.s. department of agriculture. he has a holiday message to share with you as well. [applause] >> speaker boehner, senators udall and bennett, congressman tipton and distinguished guests, on behalf of the secretary, tom vilsack and our chief of the forest service, i would like to say a few words if i can. each year, the capitol christmas tree comes from the u.s. forest service, which is an agency within usda and eachier we -- each year we select that tree from a different forest. this tree is from a small town called meeker, colorado in the white river national forest in the high mountain areas of colorado. and it's a a spruce tree and 73 feet tall and happens to be 74 years old. it's only the third time in colorado's history that colorado has provided the capitol christmas tree and i'm particularly proud of that since i'm a colorado resident. yay, colorado! [cheers and applause] >> we call this the people's tree for good reason and that's because it comes from our public lands, which are owned by al
and take. in that environment, commonplace is essential. it -- if you go through the last campaign, it is not that big of an area. compromise is required. give-and-take -- people have to accept some things they do not like as part of a larger agreement. i would say getting a comprehensive agreement now that resolve's many of these issues would at least reduce the constant threat of government shutdown. that is why this is so important going forward. >> i would remind everybody we have threats of government shut down in the past -- the famous showdown with newt gingrich and clinton. when you have divided government, you have clashes of major philosophical difference. the key is being able to have an element of compromise as part of that process. that is exactly the place we are in right now, trying to find that point. >> the best model for all of you who are working so hard on this may well be speilberg's movie about lincoln. lincoln made deals. you know what, he achieved great, great goals. it goes to the point you are making -- politicians are supposed to play politics, that is no
for the environment. we have to be able to spend the money, 7%. 2.5 years after stimulus we only had $67 billion. 35% was still sitting in washington. we have to change the law. there's some things express and the government accountability report on the selection of some of these projects. their release this march of 2011. specifically at -- bay released this march of 2011. specifically they said there were concerns about transparency and other issues with it. they cannot verify some of the criteria by which some of these projects were selected. can you cite any improvement in that process? you were citing a number of projects but also criticized by gao for the process. >> we tried to improve our decision making process. we have tried to use the governors as our partners on these projects. receiving proposals from them and from the state's and working with them -- states and working with them. try to improve our process for selecting projects. >> the other most recent report by the inspector general, released just weeks ago, saidmber 11, 2000112, it they raised concerns about the management framewor
left, let's talk about the current environment. what are you hearing from a lot of the senior executives that are asking for your advice or if you're in a board room or chatting with them especially in terms of the fiscal cliff and concern about making big decisions or lack thereof and not putting money at it. >> the interesting part is talk about the fiscal cliff is the talk about the talk about the fiscal cliff. i don't think people are as concerned as the level of chatter that goes around. i think the chatter is more than the concern. the fiscal cliff just happens to be a preset deal on a scale of one to ten. it's a deal that is possible as outcome. i think what the country should hope for is that we come up with a better deal. business wants the rules. i understand why business is very much do a deal. do a something. because a business then can make their plans around that. if a marginal tax rate goes up too high here, they'll put a plant somewhere else. you can make those decisions. they want to know the rules. >> know the rules of the road. >> there's an america out ther
are smith travel, if you look at those numbers, it's a very positive environment. the fiscal cliff will affect people when employment gets affected. this is a real issue. if you see something occurring with employment, we're sensitive, we're monitoring, we represent the folks that are going to be most affected if they don't do their job in washington. we're obviously concerned about it. if they deal with it, which we think they will. we think that next year should be pretty positive. >> meanwhile big party tonight? >> big party tonight, big party last night. >> that's what the city's all about. >> we'll be opening white plains in may, it will be a little warmer than it was up there last night. it's very exciting to see those hotels get done. 1,000 jobs for the city. >> you see at the bottom of your screen, nat gas inventory. >> listen natural gas prices are extending their gains from yet, after that 4% rally that we saw. we're looking at resistance perhaps around the 4.75 level. we saw a natural gas level that was certainly not what analysts were expectings. 65 billion cubic feet w
'll get. >> you know what, i think the environment, as you look out to next year, is really difficult, ross. i mean, you don't really know what is going to come out of the u.s. fiscal cliff, how damaging potentially that can be to u.s. confidence, u.s. activity. things seem to be holding up fairly well in china. but i think there is still going to be some concerns about the whole performance of the asian economy and whether that can actually pick up next year. and then, of course, in the eurozone itself, we seem to be mending the problems progressively and taking out the tail risks, which i think is good and that is the bottom line that investors should take going further forward, but at the same time, there are some elements that you can have. if you do a forecast, in a way you could come up with something like 1% quotes for next year, but at the same time, you have to be conscious that we've had such a battery of downside impact, downside negative news coming through really for all economists in the western world in the last few years. you have to be very cognizant of those. >> i th
environment again and really if you look at the economy, we're probably going back to the '90 style economy where you had 3%, 3.5% was really good growth. 2% growth which we're experiencing right now is pretty good. full employment might be 5.5, 6% like the old days. and i think with that being said, we've got to to get a little bit closer to those numbers to really have the economy start to take off. and i don't think we're that far in there. >> any much those numbers we would take. i don't know whether we are or not. wishful thinking for cantor. certainly would help you guys. why didn't you like fighting irish? >> they were on tv every week when i was a child and i'd like to see alabama win. >> alabama won last year. >> that's okay. all right. thank you. see you later. >>> in fact in some of the squawk sports news this morning, dallas beating philadelphia in sunday night nfl game. 38-33. tony romo threw three touchdown passes to break troy aikman's career franchise record. and the jets beat the cardinals 7-6. new york scoring the lone touchdown after mark sanchez was benched with tim tebo
] >> grover! >> stephanie: norquist and maria commented this is a different environment than the 1990s. grover said we got four years of bad regulation, higher taxes. he wants to add more taxes to the tea party too. it will starve tea party i if obama pushes us over the cliff. [ screaming ] >> can't just wait for tea party three. >> probably about 150 billion. >> stephanie: that would be bad. okay. oh, let's see. phillip in durham disagrees with everything i say. about everything? >> ever! >> stephanie: hi, phillip. >> caller: hi, stephanie. look. appreciate the show. i think you have not been fair to the facts and let me just ask you from the -- what we're talking about -- >> stephanie: the facts are oversensitive in my opinion. >> caller: that's why you're better as a comedian than a political pundit. >> stephanie: all right. >> caller: the fact of the matter is simply this. timothy geithner proposed a budget plan that was already presented to the senate and was voted down 99-0. have you told your listeners t
, it was the inaccessibility of my environment that made me feel the least welcome. i returned to a country not ready to receive me as a man who now used a wheelchair." that was the reality of an honored soldier who had overcome -- it was the reality that an honored soldier had to overcome until the united states improved its laws to protect the disabled, and it is still a reality in many places overseas, places where our veterans and other disabled citizens will likely travel in the future. either for business or pleasure. we must ratify this treaty because protecting the rights of the disabled is the right thing to do in the united states of america, and it's the right thing to do throughout the world. and let me just again thank senator kerry and senator lugar for their hard work on this treaty, and we look forward to our colleagues voting for it in just a short hour from now. i yield the floor. mr. kerry: mr. president, how much time remains? the presiding officer: we have 27 minutes remaining. mr. kerry: how much time on the opponents? the presiding officer: about the same. mr. kerry: mr. presid
. >> is it possible to ever get back to that in this environment? >> it is. you have a lot of problems with the piece. >> do you briyou believe if you rote deficit -- two different ways. you either keep the government that you have and pay for it by raising taxes, or you kind of leave taxes where they are and you shrink government down to where it pays for it. does it matter for the future and for growth which way you do it in your view? >> it does. if you put it all into like a tightening, so how much tightening occurs in the economy that would slow the economy, it's far better to actually reduce government spending than it is to actually raise taxes. >> although that hurts the economy, too. >> everything hurts the economy. so it's a question of which is most -- or least harmful and that tends to be cutting government spending. >> but i do think it's -- >> although tim geithner would disagree with me. >> one side wants to keep the government and entitlements like we have it. and the other side wants to take away all the excess government -- >> i think both sides agree that you need to do both. just
them downward. he raise the taxed and cut -- in that environment, what starbucks has basically done, voluntarily is say we'll pay our share. or at least part of it. >> appreciate it. this guy works as a consee arj in a powerful washington d.c. building. his passion to give back to his hometown in africa has now inspired a whole community. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and share something... ♪ ♪ ...or you can get out there with your friends and actually share something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. now is a good time to think about your options. are you looking for a plan that really meets your needs and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you in out-
in that environment and take whatever marginal advantage they can, not only with alawite and kurds, but everybody who remembers the experience in iraq with al qaeda. sunni jihad is as well, particularly vis-À-vis the united states or the surrogate the israelis. that is a real concern. it's one of the real tragedies of this entire affair sobol i think ambassador ford is absolutely correct by working very hard and diligently to bolster moderates, to help them both politically and materially to succeed and to win the day in syria and defeat the assad regime is absolutely the way to go and to have done that as quickly as possible. unfortunately despite ambassador ford's best efforts, my sense is that it's not really been the administration's policy, at least in practice over the last 20 months. therefore, we are perilously close. i must say i'm quite despairing that the window has almost closed in terms of an effect of u.s. ability to intervene in a meaningful way and have our interest in voice represented in a post to sawed syria and achieve anything that looks like the kind of stable political transit
. >> what happens to the money? >> what always happens to money. we have an environment where the interest rates are low, so if you reinvest it in a fixed income product, you won't make much return. you'll have capital losses on bonds. i'm very concerned about the low interest rate in the bond market and the long period of time we've had bond yield this is low. and in the stock market, you have to be careful because there could be a sorting out among stocks between high and low dividend stocks and how they perform when these guys go x dividend. >> why couldn't you invest in g chlt and g e or comcast and get a 3% yield there. either one would be a good place.or comcast and get a 3% y there. either one would be a good place. >> wasn't i invested in company x before, didn't i have that money in there and now they're giving it back? >> now you own a larger part of the company. >> no, because -- >> if you reinvest it and they buy more share, you own a larger piece of it. >> it should be equal. they've taken that cash out of the company. the stock price should adjust lower. >> but cash is not th
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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